We believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

What is a Podiatrist?

When To Call a Podiatrist

Foot Anatomy

Overview of Foot and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Foot Problems

Achilles Problems

Ankle Problems

Arch and Ball Problems

Common Foot Injuries


Diabetes and Your Feet

Diseases of the Foot

Fungus Problems

Heel Problems

Nail Problems

Skin Problems

Toe Problems

Vascular/Nerve Problems

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures


Pain Management

Surgical Procedures


Fitness and Your Feet

General Information About Fitness and Your Feet

Exercise Those Toes!


Fitness And Your Feet

Sports and Your Feet


Walking and Your Feet

Work Footwear

Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Athletic Foot Care


Children's Feet

Corns and Calluses

Diabetic Foot Care

Exercise Those Toes!

Foot Care For Seniors

Foot Self-Exam


Self-Assessment Quiz

Women's Feet

Fungus Problems

Foot Odor and Smelly Feet


Anatomy of a Shoe

Athletic Shoe Guidelines

Children's Shoes

Corrective and Prescription Shoes

What To Look For

Getting a Proper Fit

Men's Shoes

Women's Shoes

Your Footprint

Wear Patterns




Online Resources



As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Peroneal tendons are two tendons that support two important foot muscles (peroneus brevis and peroneus longus) that originate on the outside of the calves. These two muscles allow you to roll to the outside of the foot while standing.

Peroneal tendons are also called stirrup tendons because they help hold up the arch of the foot. The two muscles are held in place by a band of tissue, called the peroneal retinaculum. Injury to the retinaculum can cause this tissue to stretch or tear. When this happens, the peroneal tendons can dislocate from their groove on the back of the fibula. The tendons can be seen to roll over the outside of the fibula, which damages the tendons.

Skiing, football, basketball, and soccer are the most common sports activities leading to peroneal tendon dislocation. In some cases, ankle sprains have also caused this condition. Patients usually have to use crutches after such an injury, in order to allow the retinaculum tissue to heal and the tendons to move back to their natural position on the fibula. Sometimes a splint or compression bandage is applied to decrease swelling. Anti-inflammatory medications and ice are often part of the treatment. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.

In moderate to severe cases of injury, when the peroneal retinaculum is torn or severely stretched and susceptible to dislocation, surgery may be required.