We believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

What is a Podiatrist?

When To Call a Podiatrist

Foot Anatomy

Overview of Foot and Ankle Problems

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Foot Problems

Achilles Problems

Ankle Problems

Arch and Ball Problems

Common Foot Injuries

Deformities

Diabetes and Your Feet

Diseases of the Foot

Fungus Problems

Heel Problems

Nail Problems

Skin Problems

Toe Problems

Vascular/Nerve Problems

Medical Care

Diagnostic Procedures

Orthotics

Pain Management

Surgical Procedures

Therapies

Fitness and Your Feet

General Information About Fitness and Your Feet

Exercise Those Toes!

Aerobics

Fitness And Your Feet

Sports and Your Feet

Stretching

Walking and Your Feet

Work Footwear

Foot Care

Basic Foot Care Guidelines

Athletic Foot Care

Blisters

Children's Feet

Corns and Calluses

Diabetic Foot Care

Exercise Those Toes!

Foot Care For Seniors

Foot Self-Exam

Pedicures

Self-Assessment Quiz

Women's Feet

Fungus Problems

Foot Odor and Smelly Feet

Shoes

Anatomy of a Shoe

Athletic Shoe Guidelines

Children's Shoes

Corrective and Prescription Shoes

What To Look For

Getting a Proper Fit

Men's Shoes

Women's Shoes

Your Footprint

Wear Patterns

Links

Government

Associations/Groups

Online Resources

 

 

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.



Patients who undergo surgery to correct arthritis in the foot are often diabetics with a type of arthritis known as Charcot Foot. The average age of patients developing a Charcot foot is 40 years. About one-third of patients develop a Charcot foot in both feet and/or ankles. This form of arthritis can develop suddenly and without pain. Quite suddenly, the bones in the foot and/or ankle can spontaneously fracture and fragment, often causing a severe deformity.

The arch of the foot often collapses, and pressure areas develop on the bottom of the foot, leading to open sores or ulcers.

While many of these deformities can be treated with nonsurgical care, surgery may be required. Such instances may include:

  • Chronic deformity with increased plantar pressures and risk of ulcers.
  • Chronic deformity with significant instability that cannot be corrected by braces.
  • Significant deformity that may include ulcers that don't heal or respond to therapy.

Surgical procedures used to treat arthritis include:

  • Hindfoot and ankle realignment. This kind of procedure is usually prescribed when there is significant instability resulting in a patient being unable to walk. Various types of internal fixation are placed within the foot during this kind of procedures.
  • Midfoot realignment. This kind of procedure is usually prescribed when there is significant instability of the middle portion of the foot. During a midfoot realignment, various types of internal fixation are placed within the foot.
  • Ostectomy. In this procedure, a portion of bone is removed from the bottom of the foot. It is usually performed for a wound on the bottom of the foot that is secondary to pressure from a bony prominence.